‘Slowly-Mindfully-Silently’

All retreats are in the Theravada tradition with a focus on the Satipatthana Buddhist meditation practice. The practice encourages and supports continuity of mindfulness throughout the day.

During retreats, yogis follow a timetable that includes alternative sessions of sitting and walking meditation. Yogis are encouraged to act ‘Slowly, Mindfully and Silently’ during mediation sessions as well as when performing daily activities.

As part of the daily schedule, yogis have the opportunity to listen to a dhamma talk that supports the practice. There are daily ‘Question and Answer’ sessions with the Teacher that allow yogis to receive clarification on the technique and advice on the approach and experiences.

 

Abiding by Eight Precepts

During retreats, yogis are expected to abide by the traditional eight precepts:

1. Harmlessness: not intentionally harming or destroying living creatures

2. Trustworthiness: not taking anything that is not given

3. Chastity: refraining from any sexual activity

4. Right Speech: avoiding false, abusive or malicious speech

5. Sobriety: refraining from taking any intoxicating drinks or drugs

6. Renunciation: refraining from the partaking of solids after midday

7. Restraint: refraining from sensual entertainment or bodily adornments (not wearing make-up, jewellery or immodest clothing; not playing music or musical instruments; refraining from dancing; singing and the use of adornments and ornaments)

8. Alertness: to refrain from using high and luxurious seats and beds

 

nissaranawanaya_meditator

Observing Noble Silence

Noble Silence is observed at all retreats. This means no talking or non-verbal communication of any kind, except of course in emergencies and discussion times with the Teacher.

Noble Silence applies not only to speech but also to any signals, gestures and written notes as well as to external contact by telephone or internet.

Time spent in silence and solitude helps the mind to let go of distractions and to focus as much as possible on inner mind states. Restraint of the senses provides an essential foundation for the powerful inner work undertaken by yogis during meditation retreats.

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